Fabulous Fusion at Winey Cow


Originally published in Peninsula Essence

When you enjoy dinner at the Winey Cow, you are not only sampling magnificent food but being taken on a journey of flavours created by executive chef, David Ryan.

Since launching the dinner menu last month, the Winey Cow has transitioned from day time service to fine dining with a unique edge.

“We opened a few weeks ago to fabulous reviews,” said Chef David whose menu is inspired by his own travels through Asia. “Our menu is unique as it reflects my experience in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia, using Australian produce with Asian flavours and Asian cooking techniques.”

The executive chef, who has been kitchen head for the Winey Cow and other affiliated venues for several years, David is putting his heart and soul into creating the perfect dinner menu, using a Japanese barbecue called Konro Hibachi.

“Using the Asian barbecue cooking technique, we have been able to create flavours that are unique to the Peninsula,” said David who started as a chef 16 years ago straight out of high school. “The dishes we are trying to create are based on my travels throughout Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia. This is the food I go out to eat and my interpretation of the flavours. Using the Konro which is a Japanese coal fired barbecue lets us create the food and flavours as it was cooked back in the day. The Japanese barbecue insulates the coals creating an intense heat that cooks the food quickly, and keeps the flavour in.”

With this modern Australian, Asian inspired menu, Davis has created a wonderful balance of food that is very sweet, salty, sour and a perfect match with the Peninsula wines the Winey Cow has in abundance.

It took a couple of weeks to get the menu to where I want it, playing with lots of flavours and working with different ideas to incorporate the Asian influence,” said David, who designed the menu around the Konro barbecue. “I had always wanted to use a barbecue like this, love cooking over coals and smoking is becoming quite popular now in restaurants but there’s nothing like it in other places on the Peninsula.”